In researching the relative strengths of English and Dutch merchants, I was surprised to learn just how many other European states also tried to get a …
Some remarkable things happen to our bodies when we don’t eat fresh food for a long time. From the absence of Vitamin C alone, the waste matter of our …
“It seems a wonder to the world, that such a small country, not fully so big as two of our best shires, having little natural wealth, victuals, timber …
You’re reading my newsletter, Age of Invention, on the causes of the British Industrial Revolution and the history of innovation. This free edition cur…
I’ve become interested in how some countries’ merchants became especially effective in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries — particularl…
The question I keep coming back to in my research right now, and in this newsletter too, is why London expanded so extraordinarily over the course of t…
Was medicine in the past really quite so bad?
I’ve become engrossed this week by a book written in 1638, by the merchant Lewes Roberts — The Marchant’s Mappe of Commerce. It is, in effect, a guide …
It’s been another productive week of book-writing for me, largely incorporating many of the last few posts I’ve been sharing with you on the history of…
Something significant happened to the English countryside in the century before 1650. Although England’s population merely recovered to its pre-Black D…
As I set out last week, I’ve been investigating the sources of Britain’s extraordinary ability to feed its own structural transformation. From a predom…
Whatever happened to “the Agricultural Revolution” of seventeenth and eighteenth-century Britain? In recent years I’ve hardly seen the term used at all…